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Greetings from Seattle, Washington, USA

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Fascinating Fence [from the United Kingdom]

One of our followers recently sent us an email. The follower, who lives in the United Kingdom, watches our blog carefully and has noticed our posts featuring fences. He recently spotted a fence that looked worthy of stopping for a couple of photos. We are glad he did and also that he sent them to us to use on the blog. Take a look ... be sure to click for larger view ...



We found this fence to be quite fascinating. It's kind of like a basket weave but on a much larger scale. We asked him for any info he had on it and he replied that it appears to be made of willow with hazelnut posts. "Hazel is good for fencing post. Hazelnut was used for thatching straw stacks on farms years ago, 1940 to about 1958, also on thatched cottage roofs for pining the roof shocks (straw) in place. Today plastic pins are used to pin the reeds in place on thatched cottage refurbishments. A lot of Willow is used for bespoke fencing and the big trees are used for cricket bat manufacturing, etc." The fence is located northeast of London in an area known as Norfolk.

We are always looking for "Good Fences" and this one is fascinating and pretty unique. Many thanks to our follower for taking the photos, sending them to us, and then giving us all the info.



Linking up today with Good Fences --- Thank you Tex for hosting!

Thank you for stopping by John's Island.

32 comments:

  1. Cool, I like the basket weave design. Great photos, thanks for sharing. Happy Thursday!

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  2. yes it is an interessting fence John.

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  3. It does look like a basket weave that became a fence. Nice, John, and thanks to the fellow reader for the information. :-)

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  4. Love this basket weave fence. Great shots and info.
    Happy June! CM

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  5. Cool...have never seen one like that before!

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  6. Great! Beautiful! Here in the Netherlands, many people have such a fence. You can only use two or three years old willow branches. Such a fence you only can make from November until spring, because only in this period the branches are flexible enough.

    Beautiful post!

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  7. Gracious, that looks like it took a lot of work to build. Good one!

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  8. wow! spectacular! thanks for sharing this, john - and to your friend across the pond!

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  9. Fun to see those photos! England has so many interesting fences, including the hedgerows.

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  10. That's amazing, I've never seen one like it.
    ~

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  11. we have this type of fencing in jamestown and williamsburg...i think it's called wattle fencing, or something like that! it's pretty neat!

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  12. That time of fencing is very popular over here in Sweden too.

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  13. That is one cool fence. neat he sent you the pics.

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  14. That's a traditional wattle fence, a very old type of fence construction. The wood used is obtained by "coppicing", that is cutting a tree down very close to ground level, this does not kill the tree which responds by sending up a crown of thin, vertical shafts which can then be harvested after a few years to provide thin, straight, flexible poles which are ideal for such a job.Moveable hurdles are also made using this method and can be used on the farm when handling stock. Willow and hazel are the usual timbers used. The infill for walls of half-timbered houses is made in the same way, though in this case the wattle is covered with a layer of clay and is known as "wattle and daub".

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  15. Very unique that's for sure...:)

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  16. That is certainly unique.Should be fairly critter proof as well.

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  17. Wow that is really cool. A basket weave - that is the exact thought I had when I first saw the picture. It is a work of art.

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  18. A beautiful, natural-looking fence.

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  19. That sure is an interesting fence. Imagine all the work that went into its creation!

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  20. Yes that is very unique and different. I bet it took some time to weave. So glad you share it.

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  21. Neat fence. W don't make enough use of natural materials for a lot of things.

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  22. A really different type of fencing. Very interesting, it makes yo want to step up and touch it.

    Diana
    http://adifferentlenslens365.blogspot.co.nz/2015/06/a-big-rain-bomb.html

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  23. What a nice fence, really interesting and unique. Very beautiful post!

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  24. That indeed is a fascinating fence. I love the basket weave and suspected that it was willow.
    Norfolk is such a beautiful area, especially at the sea. I love it there and spent several weeks there when I was way younger. I remember a tiny place called Cley-next-the-Sea especially fondly.

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  25. Looks like an old basket weave pattern. Cool!

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  26. I also thank you, John, for your nice comments on my blog.
    Have a great weekend!
    Pietro

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  27. That is a very neat fence! I've never seen one quite like it.

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