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Greetings from Seattle, Washington, USA

Friday, November 9, 2018

Astoria, Oregon

Fall Coastal Cruise -
October 18th - Port Stop Astoria, Oregon

Throwing out the lines.
Astoria, Oregon
October 18th  10:46 AM
The whole process of docking a large floating vessel is pretty fascinating. Watching the entire procedure can give you a good idea about the Captain’s experience. Astoria, Oregon, does not see many cruise ships visit and part of that may be due to the challenge of getting securely tied up here. When we get close enough the crew in the photo above throws out a lightweight line to stevedores on the dock. That line gives them a way to pull the heavy ropes to the cleats that will hold the ship in place.


We are docked in front of another fascination … the Astoria-Megler Bridge. The Astoria–Megler Bridge (for US Highway 101) is a steel cantilever through truss bridge that spans the lower Columbia River, between Astoria, Oregon, and Point Ellice near Megler, Washington. Opened 52 years ago in 1966, it is the longest continuous truss bridge in North America.


The photo below (by Bob Heims, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) gives some perspective on the bridge. In the distance the Columbia River flows into the Pacific Ocean. There is a famous sand bar known as the Columbia Bar. Wiki says, "The bar is where the river's current dissipates into the Pacific Ocean, often as large standing waves. The waves are partially caused by the deposition of sediment as the river slows, as well as mixing with ocean waves. The waves, wind, and current are hazardous for vessels of all sizes." As we approached the Bar --- both on arrival and departure --- our Captain made official announcements to be prepared for significant motion which might be enough to cause a fall.

Overview -- Port of Astoria, Oregon
and the Astoria-Megler Bridge
(Photo by Bob Heims - Wiki - Public Domain)

Holland America's Eurodam
Docked in Astoria, Oregon, October 18, 2018

Good Golly, Miss Molly?
Yes, she is here.

Next: San Diego Sunday

13 comments:

  1. Fascinating photos and comments. Since I have never been on a ship all this is so interesting.Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you Ruth. While posting about cruising I'm trying to include info that will be helpful to those who haven't cruised and are considering trying it out. If you have questions, please let me know in the comments. Thanks again, John.

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  2. I have never been on a cruise ship, so for me, I am learning how it's all done. Never heard of the Columbia Bar, but it does sound ominous. Glad everything went just fine. :-)

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    1. Thank you DJan. If you have questions about cruising I hope you'll let me know in the comments. Always appreciate hearing from you! Have a great weekend!

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  3. I find it amazing that those ships are so huge.
    We went on a cruise once. Glad I went once but wouldn't want to go an another one.
    A beautiful bridge. I've seen some documentaries on building bridges and it always fascinates me.

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    1. Hi Happyone, Thank you, as always, for stopping by and leaving me a comment. I sure hear you about cruising. While I love it, I totally understand that it's not everyone's cup of tea. If you see this reply, and have a moment, I hope you will tell me why you won't go on another cruise. Thanks again and have a great weekend! John

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    2. Too many people, too much food, and I just find it a bit boring. I'd rather be walking out in the woods.
      My favorite vacation of all time was hiking with the Wayfarers across England and the next year we did The Ring of Kerry in Ireland.

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    3. Thanks, Happyone. The crowds on cruise ships can sure take away the enjoyment for me too. After several cruises on the big ships with 2,000 to 3,000 passengers, I've tried smaller ships. About 1,200 is still a lot of folks but much more tolerable. Actually, my dream is to do a "Freighter Cruise" with only a half dozen or so passengers. Thanks again!

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  4. Technology today has it made it possible to maneuver large ships in close quarters.

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    1. Yes, our Captain had a talk called "Ask the Captain." He actually said the GPS guided system can do a better job of guiding the ship than manual control by a human. Interesting. Thanks for stopping by and the comment.

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  5. Hello, neat views of the ship, port and bridge. The captain has a nerve racking job at times. Enjoy your day and weekend!

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    1. Hi Eileen, Thank you for the kind words. You are so right, the Captain's job is no piece of cake. I always try to attend the presentations on board called "Ask the Captain." Very interesting to me. Have a happy weekend and thanks again!

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  6. I love the Holland America's Eurodam :-) Great photo.

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