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Greetings from Seattle, Washington, USA

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Remote Valley

We recently spent a few days in a part of the USA that is largely unknown to most of her citizens. Some would call it the middle of nowhere, others a peaceful escape. Fishermen love it for the scenic beauty, and one of the best fly fishing rivers in the world ... the Madison. Named after the river, it is known as the Madison Valley. Here are a few photos to give you the flavor ...

US highway 287, looking south, traverses the remote valley ... notice the traffic, which is normal ...


The Madison Mountain Range ...


Much of the valley includes a series of "benches" ... geologists tell us they are the shores of an ancient lake ... note the benches in the shot below ... also visible in the first photo above ...



The mountain known as Sphinx ... can you see the sphinx?


Below, known as Fan Mountain, it's to the west of Lone Mountain, the home of Big Sky ski resort ...


Sunset, October 4, 2014, in the forgotten valley ...


Do you see the face of the sleeping giant in the mountain? (small rectangle) Is that another giant in the cloud above? (large rectangle) OR, have we simply had too much coffee?


And where is this?



Thank you for stopping by John's Island.

5 comments:

  1. Yes, I see the giant, and the one in the clouds, too. Wonderful pictures of the snow-capped mountains. :-)

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  2. John, one just has to use a little imagination to see the giant on the mountain. Love that Blue Sky country, as we spent a bit of time near there this summer.

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  3. It looks like a beautiful part of the country and not as congested as some places. I like that.

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  4. What a beautiful part of the country and your pictures are breathtaking. I can see both giants too. : )

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  5. I love to visit remote, quiet areas. Madison Mountain Range is breathtaking! How very observant of you ... yes, I can see both giants. When photographing such scenes, it is often difficult to capture the magnitude and scale of the mountains. You achieved this beautifully, John! Stellar images, as always!

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