Policy

Greetings from Seattle, Washington, USA

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Recipe Week [P3] -- Yellow Cake and More!

For our 3rd post in Recipe Week, 3 recipes on 1 postcard ... all using Emergency Flour ... Hope you can find it! ....

Aunt Jenny is awesome but where can I find "emergency flour"?
Which one sounds best:  Chocolate-Frosted Yellow Cake ... Spice Loaf with Raisin Cream Frosting ... or Favorite Devil's Food Cake?

"Test cake well to be sure it is done before removing from oven
as baking is especially critical with emergency flour."
Do you think we could substitute regular flour?  Thank you for stopping by John's Island.

Update - Emergency Flour and Spry - After preparing this post we did a little extra research on the WWW and discovered this: Emergency Flour was mandated by the Federal Government for a couple of years around the end of WWII. Apparently there was a shortage of regular flour at the time and by adding some extra ingredients they could make "regular" flour go further. Spry was like Crisco ... a shortening. In some forums on cooking history old timers say they often used butter or margarine instead of shortening in the recipes like we have in our post today.

17 comments:

  1. I think the spice cake sounds delicious, after reading all the ingredients. I vaguely remember Spry in my grandmother's kitchen years ago, but emergency flour? Nope! This is fun, John. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. When I read "emergency flour" I thought about after war times right away. Heard too many stories at home, how they replaced certain items because they didn't have anything else.
    Worst food in those times was "turnip". Turnip with turnip with turnip. :))
    And turnips need fat to be tasty and they didn't have that also. So they were just cooked in water, and that's how they tasted :)
    Had an uncle who didn't eat them for years because he knew they didn't taste good. Then my mom made them one day without telling him what it was, it had enough fat, herbs and spices in it and he loved it. He couldn't believe it was the same thing when my mom told him what it was :))

    Your card is a great find but I don't think I would try any of those :)

    Have a great day John!
    Sigi

    ReplyDelete
  3. 3 recipes on 1 postcard, so interesting!

    ReplyDelete
  4. WOW! You could send a postcard for one cent???

    ReplyDelete
  5. Fascinating! Never heard of emergency flour before.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Interesting to look back on these old recipes. John,I have disabled my Google+ for the blog,so hopefully that will help.I am not a fan of Google+,as you say it is confusing and I certainly don't need any help in that department. Ha!Ha1.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love it! Special the first with choclat.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh, how nice, John! 3 cake recipes! The first one sounds the best to me. :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Another great reciep card! My favorite would be the chocolate frosted yellow cake.. YUM!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I just read those recipes and was about to ask what Spry is. Thanks for doing the checking for me! I think I'll take the Devil's Food Cake!

    By the way, John thank you once again for giving to help Baby Fidelis and her mother to travel for surgery coming up soon. I'm sure the organizers and the family appreciate your help so much and I pray that others will follow your kind example. Fidelis is now one year old and that growth is getting so big. I hope that it doesn't do any permanent damage as it is quite dangerous to the brain (and other parts). Thanks so much again!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I had never heard of emergency flour - and it's quite surprising to read that there was a shortage of flour while - at least according to the recipes - there was enough cocoa, sugar and cinnamon to bake cakes.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'll go with the Devil's food cake and skip that spice cake!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I agree with Michelle...Devil's food cake. I'm not a fan of raisins, so the spice cake is out, and chocolate frosting on a yellow cake just doesn't make sense to me.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Use of different ingredients are what makes cookbooks go around.

    ReplyDelete